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of them palestinians. palestinian militants have continued firing weapons into israel. in cairo, discussions are ongoing about cease-fire. jeremy our coverage from gaza. >> good morning, gaza. this was the wake-up call sent in by israel. growing up in gaza is not easy. not far away, is the rubble left by the israeli strike on sunday that killed 10 members of this family including four children and two neighbors. they are looking for the remains of a teenage girl missing and presumed dead. this man is a relative of the dead. >> sad, may be strong. >> street are getting tougher, more solid. when they tell the parents of a boy, he will grow up for revenge. >> during the last of years, the conflict has been overshadowed by dramatic changes elsewhere in the middle east. the differences between the two sides got sharper. what makes this crisis difficult and dangerous is it is happening in a region more unstable than at any time since the 1950's. hamas released videos of rocket launches. the events of the last few weeks have silenced those who said they had forgotten how to fight israe
for americans inside he egypt and our embassy in cairo vazing them to avoid large clouds there and the embassy reporting protesters are pelting nearby police guarding with molotov cocktails and all of this is a backlash against morsi escalating reports tonight of one person killed and another injured on attacks on muslim brotherhood north of cairo and the muslim brotherhood morsi's political party and angered many opposition activist was a power grab, and giving himself near absolute control of egypt. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo. he understands you're in tahrir square? >> reporter: harris, that square behind me, as you can see from our live pictures, more tents have sprung up as the evening has gone on and those protesters say they are there to say we're hearing some small explosions and tear gas after three nights of protests here, skirmishes, and at least 500 people injured in those protests and now a death tonight as well. this coming north of cairo when an office of the muslim brotherhood, the group that supports the president was attacked, one 15-year-old boy killed
's apparently wrapped up talk in cairo with president morsi, who this time yesterday was saying a truce, at least a cease-fire of some sorts, was just hours, hours away. let's go to tel aviv. sara sidner is standing by. tell our viewers what happened just a few hours ago. >> reporter: around noon, tel aviv time, there was an explosion on the number 61 bus. it was very close to the military headquarters here, very close to the courts here, along a street that was eventually block off by police. at least 22 people were injured, some of those people were on the bus, some outside the bus. they suffered everything from panic attacks to a couple teenagers who have the worst of the injuries. we talked to the e.r. doctor who told us one of the teenagers may lose a limb, perhaps an arm because of the soft tissue that's been blasted away. also a lot of shrapnel wounds in the face. both may face a lifetime of disability. those are his words. we talked to the police, more still looking for a suspect, trying to find out who was responsible. we saw the bus before testify driven away. all the windows
indeed. kevin connolly in cairo. the spokes person for the israeli defense force joins us live from tel aviv. thanks for being with us. what's your reaction to the fact more rockets appeared to have been fired at tel aviv? it shows the palestinian militants in gaza have longer- range rockets. >> of far, they have not managed to really target tel aviv according to my initial investigation. rockets did not hit the ground in tel aviv as of yet. we were aware they have these capabilities. this is why we targeted their the groundd -- on th fire fight. they have a rocket destined to read tel aviv. >> how long will the military offensive in gaza continue? reservists have been drafted in. is that the precursor to a ground operation? >> the operation will continue as long as we reach our goal. the main goal of the operation is to defend nearly 3 million israelis currently under this immediate rocket danger from gaza launched by hamas and other terrorist organizations. this is what all options are still on the table, including a ground operation. we are currently assessing our next steps and wil
happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waiting for as far as the demonstrations, when pro and anti-people on the ground will try and march. we'll get a gauge of their numbers to see how strong they are. right now opposition figures say they will be no dialogue with the egyptian president until he revokes the decree. >> gregg: give us a sense of the number
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
had gathered in cairo's tahrir square calling for the ouster of president mohamed morsy. opposition leaders say new powers grabbed by morsy make him look like a dictator. reza sayah has more on the massive protests. >> reporter: outrage, clashes and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsy. >> we're here because we don't want morsy to rule us anymore. >> a one-man show. he wants to do everything. nothing at all of what we want, you know? >> reporter: on thursday, the new president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says will designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that's still missing a parliament. >> one of his decrees bans anyone from overturning any of his declarations since he took over office in june. that order is
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
pictures now. cairo, egypt, tahrir square. and thousands of people are refusing to go home. they are angry at their president. they say he's made himself a dictator. it's quiet now in cairo. it's just after 2:00 a.m., but it definitely was not quiet earlier in the day. listen. tear gas filled the air and crowds of protesters scattered when riot police tried to break up the protests in cairo. we have reports of demonstrators trying to break into the offices of the president's party, the muslim brotherhood. and at least one person reportedly died today in the street violence, a teenager. cnn's reza sayah spent much of the day right in the middle of the chaos in cairo. >> we keep seeing these clashes between protesters and police, protesters throwing rocks at police. police responding by firing tear gas and stun grenades. we're just a few blocks away from tahrir square. we should point out most of these protesters are young men, 20-something, teenagers, hard to say if they're here fighting for democracy or here to cause some trouble. those were chants of down with president mo
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
is good. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> cairo to istanbul, anger erupting over the latest conflict involving israel and hamas. these pictures come to us from indonesia, more than 5,000 people march through the streets of jakarta sunday, protesting israeli air strikes. the crowd marched to the u.s. embassy carrying flag and posters condemning israel. let's turn to egypt and a narrow strip of land that borders gaza. the rafa border, that's the crossing, this is gaza's only gateway to an arab ally. let's turn from this map to what is happening on the ground. the rafah crossing has become a dangerous place to be. it is a major crossing point for protesters and for those who are trying to smuggle weapons and supplies into gaza. israel says it is bombing smuggling tunnels that run under rafah. the border crossing is clogged with anti-israel protesters, trying to gain access to gaza. reza sayah reports. >> reporter: this is where egypt's border meets gaza. gaza is a small piece of land, about twice the size of washington, d.c. it has four gateways, three of them are inside israel. they're
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
the border. today secretary general ban ki-moon arrived in cairo to support egyptian-led efforts at a cease-fire. yesterday, president obama spoke about the situation from thailand, he is viz thing country as part of a three-country asia tour. >> we are fully supportive of israel's right to defend itself from missiles landing on people's homes and workplaces and potentially killing civilians. and we will continue to support israel's right to defend itself. >> rose: here's what "cbs evening news" reported today from the war zone. >> an angry crowd gathered outside a hospital in gaza this morning as bodies of children killed in yesterday's air strike were brought out to be buried. the four children died, along with their mother and four other family members when their three-story home was hit by an israeli air strike. the husband and father who lost his family was inconsolable. the israeli military says the house is targeted because they believe the hamas commander responsible for launching missiles toward israel was hiding there. but with nine members of the same family killed, the israelis
-fire, these talks taking place in cairo have told nbc news they are serious, that they are making progress and that this is how the negotiations stand right at this moment. the israelis want a two-part deal, a two-stage deal. the first part would be an immediate hostility, immediate cessation of violence, both sides stop attacking each other. that would be unconditional. then israel would want to move to a second stage where the two sides, israel and the palestinians, would engage in this discussions, negotiations overs the next two weeks to one month talking about potentially ending the siege on gaza, making it easier for palestinians -- >> and clearly we're having difficulty with richard's reporting. surmounts any difficult of technology. richard is reporting on negotiations in cairo -- amman, you're in gaza as well. negotiations would be a immediate cessation of hostilities and a two-stage process within two weeks to a month there would be a broader agreement. we've known from the start that israel wants to do something about changing the reality where these rocket attacks do not contin
in cairo. meameanwhile, as you mentioned,t far from where i'm standing, troops and attention are ready for a possible ground incursion. we heard from the exiled leader of hamas. he held a news conference in cairo this afternoon. he said he's not calling for any type of escalation but he said, and i quote him, we will not accept any israeli demands. they were the ones who attacked. the cease-fire will occur when our demands are met. what are those demands? they're reportedly calling for an end to the blockade of gaza and no mortar getted assassinations by israel. israel, meanwhile, wants a buffer zone set up along the border with gaza and they want the rocket fire to cease before the current escalation began earlier this year, there were hundreds and hundreds of rockets fired by militants from gaza into israel. just hours ago, shaun, air read sirens went off in israel. militants fired at least three voyles of rockets. overhead we can see the iron dome missile defense system doing its job. there were no injuries. the israeli military is keeping up pressure on the militants in gaza. just
to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> rose: the secretary of state travels to cairo tomorrow to take part in further negotiations, joining me now is rashid khalidi, he is the edward site professor of modern arab studies in columbia university, in washington dennis ross is with the washington institute for near east policy and a former u.s. envoy to the middle east. >> and abrams on the council for foreign relations a deputy national security advisor for global democracy strategy for president bush. his book tested by zion comes out later this year and i am pleased to have all of them here on this program this evening. i begin with dennis ross, tell me where you think we are at this moment, dennis. >> well, i do think the outline of the cease-fire are probably getting pretty close to being finalized, i don't think they are quite finalized yet, not because the outlines are unclear but because i think there is probably a desire to have the secretary of state make certain that the understandings are understood the same way by all of the parties, number one, number 2, that there are actually p
hillary clinton is in cairo this morning working to make that peace happen. can egypt help bring an end to the fighting? and back at home, all eyes on the white house for a thanksgiving tradition. the presidential turkey pardon. get ready to gobble up the history of this bird watch. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, november 21st, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert filling in for the great chuck todd. a commuter bus exploded in central tel aviv injuring at least 19 people steps away from the national defense he headquarters. israeli police confirm that an explosive device detonated but say it was not a suicide attack. the white house is calling the attack against israeli civilians outrage o outrageous. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo
krueger. clashes in cairo today, more protests in tahrir square against egypt's president morsi. we'll have a live report. move over george clooney the on yan's kim junge un the sexiest man alive and beijing doesn't get the joke. good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. no joke today on capitol hill. ambassador susan rice's attempt to clear the air with republicans over benghazi did not work as the white house had hoped. senators mccain, ayotte and graham say they have more questions than they had before rice's comments about benghazi. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get it. >> if you don't know what happened just say you don't know what happened. people can push you to give explanations and you can say i don't want to give bad information. >> that's troubling to me as well, why she wouldn't have asked, i'm the person that doesn't know anything about this, i'm going on every single show. >> joining me now for our daily fix, chris cizilla, msnbc contributor managing editor of post politics.com and our own nbc capito
, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal yet. he didn't rule out there wouldn't be a deal but he said there's no deal yet. until all of the is are dotted, t richardson cros are crossed. until there's a deal, there's no deal, as they like to say, the diplomatic community. >> we also know the president, president obama, has called and talked to the preside
senior hamas official who said that at 9:00 p.m. cairo time, 10:00 p.m. eastern standard time, that there would be an announcement in cairo, by an official, from the egyptian government and from hamas, announcing some sort of agreement for at least a temporary cease-fire. however, we're hearing from other hamas officials that israel has yet to agree to this proposed cease-fire and the israelis are saying there is nothing as of yet. but the idea is rather than send out broad guidelines for a period of peace and calm, they just want to see if both sides can keep the peace. now, one of the concerns here is that it is not just hamas who is operating in gaza, there are other groups like islamic jihad, affiliated with iran, even smaller splinter groups out there that hamas doesn't necessarily control completely. and therefore that's why they want to give this -- this initial period to see if the peace can indeed or quiet or calm can hold. >> ben, in terms of the entire region, and we're standing sort of by a map which i want to show our viewers, this and is of israel, you've got the
of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's side that compromise may be in the offing. perhaps a scaling down of that presidential decree which basically puts the president above the law and above the courts. the judges have been one of the bitterest opponents of the movement by the president. many judges across the country actually going out on strike. we may see a compromise in the meeting. appears the president underestimated the reaction to hi
turn violent here in cairo and other cities. buildings torched. police cars torched. a lot of tear gas and pepper spray in the shutdowns between protestors and security forces. and morsi and the top justices. many chief justices here in cairo and across the country they will no longer to go work until the president repeals his decrease for a power grab. we're seen what could be a show down on the streets. that is when supporters on tuesday and saying that he is trying to be a dictator will face off. both opponents and supporters of the president hauling out people and major marches expected on tuesday. >> heather: steve, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions
whether it is the cairo speech he delivered in 2009 or your repeated at important declarations on prevention of the iranian nuclear capability, actions matter most. do not mistake the former for the latter. i have to step out of my role for a moment because as an historian, today is the anniversary of my favorite ever presidential statement on the middle east. 70 years ago today, president franklin delano roosevelt issued the following statement to the peoples of the middle east -- imagine a president saying this -- "praise be done to you under god the compassionate and made the blessing of god be upon you. this is a great deal for you because behold, we, the american holy warriors have arrived. we have come here to fight the great jihad of freedom. we have come to set you free. today is the 70th anniversary of the landing on north africa. imagine an american president praising the great jihad of american freedom. we don't remember that because of words matter so much less than actions. all right, if those are three broad lessons, what are the three most urgent issues of your a
are the greatest defender of the arab cause, which is the palestinian cause. and it works. go to cairo, to the shops of cairo, and you will see photographs of ahmadinejad, an iranian leader. why? because he stands up for the palestinians. that's the game the iranians play, and my guess is the more horrible the pictures are out of gaza the more there is a sense of this massive drift of power between israel and the palestinians. the more iran will be seen as one of the few countries that is willing to really stand up and speak against the west and, you know, they have, as you know, very colorful rhetoric, but that's all geared towards this regional gain where they're almost outwitting the arab against the palestinians. >> let me veer off to israel for a moment. benjamin netanyahu is up for reelection soon. how much do you think what's happening now, this rousing with gaza, does or doesn't have anything to do with him? >> we have to hope this has nothing to do with that because this is a very serious business. not only is he taking his own country into a military operation, he is risking
israeli official has arrived in cairo for talks on possibly securing a truce, if that's possible at all with hamas. we go live along the gaza/israeli border with the latest for you. >> reporter: this country is on the brink of war. there is no question about t. we move locations since we talked an hour ago to a safer ground here. >> as we moved, we saw israeli troops pounding in rubber mats over parts of the highway here so they can drive tanks over them and maneuver in this area around the gaza border. it has been a very bloody day in the air war, the israeli airstrikes in gaza continue with huge bright-orange glows from the strip behind us, at least a dozen, if not more palestinians have been killed, including a number of civilians and children just today alone, bringing the death toll to more than 50 here in israel. the rockets flying out of the gaza strip that injured at least a dozen people. looming the gaza border, the israeli army has armored personnel and tank platoons laid out all over the place. the palestinians are not waste anything time to try to take pot shots in the morta
. >> don't interrupt me. right now, there's an israeli in cairo dealing with the egyptians who are walking down the hall and talking with hamas. israel knows who they're dealing with here, they know quite well who they're dealing with here, and they can make a deal with them. what's wrong with that. >> let's not pretend that israel and hamas are not speaking to each other. >> i hope they are speaking to each other. we have to leave it there. please come back soon. that was a fascinating debate. an american icon, a preview of a o aritooladan conrsio >> a lot of the people of gaza are not happy about the fact that hamas fighters are fighting in bunkers that were built for them. leaving their own civilians to be exposed, firing rockets through the civilian areas. >> let's finish the history that mark was talking about there. it's very important. >> the whole entire point of isolating and cutting off gaza, hamas controlled gaza, was to punish them for the election of hamas, and to say that this kind of intransigence against israel is not going to be tolerated. at the same time, we will open u
in this process. i will carry this message to cairo tomorrow. i will also be consulting with president abas in ramala. let me also say to echo the prime minister, i'm very pleased that the iron dome defense system is performing so well. our partnership in support of this system represents america's enduring commitment to the safety and security of the israeli people and to israel's right to defend itself. but no defense is perfect. and our hearts break for the loss of every civilian israeli and palestinian and for all those who have been wounded or who are living in fear and danger. i know today was a difficult day. and i offer my deepest condolences to the loved ones of those who were lost and injured. in the end there is no substitute for security and for a just and lasting peace. and the current crisis certainly focuses us on the urgency of this broader goal. so in the days ahead the united states will work with our partners here in israel and across the region toward an outcome that bolsters security for the people of israel, improves conditions for the people of gaza and moves toward a
leaders from both sides met in cairo to discuss putting an end to the bloodshed. egyptian president mohamud morsi is overseeing the talks and he has become the central figure in the delicate negotiations. morsi was at his sister's funeral today but he did issue a statement saying israeli aggression would end today. tuesday. at the end of the day the two sides still had not reached agreement. a hamas official told reuters they had come close but the talks "must wait until tomorrow." now this is morsi's real debut on the world stage. he rose from his position as head of the engineering department at a cairo university to become president of egypt last year. it's really an intriguing story. morsi replaced, as you know, president hosni mubarak who had been in power for three decades and was one of israel's few allies in the region and morsi ran as the muslim brotherhood's candidate and he promised to implement islamic law. but analysts say that he's not really a true religious fundamentalist. that he had to adopt those p
into the central square in cairo to call for an end to the new egyptian leader's regime. it was an enormous show of strength from the opposition that spent days blasting egypt he is new president, morsi. he upset just about everybody last week when he decided to give himself broad new powers that say his decisions don't need approval from any court. essentially he's above the law. really no different than a dictator. protests showed their across the country, some of them violent. street fighting this between demonstrators and police. president morsi tried to calm the criticism by promising to reserve his new powers for only the most important decisions. but that didn't appease the protesters. remember, just last week, the united states was publicly praising president morsi when he helped end the conflict between israel and gaza. the white house says president obama has not spoken to his egyptian counterpart since then and today the press secretary jay carney said basically the egyptians need to work this out themselves. there is no evidence that will happen any time soon. right now this enormous
" in order to promote stability. steve harrigan is live in cairo. what is the draft constitution? >>reporter: well, opposition figures including the nobel peace prize laureate is calling the constitution a coup against democracy. they are sharply criticizing it as a rush drive, 16 hours of voting on a constitution, pushing it through only after all moderates, liberals and christians have left the room in protest. right now it stands to go to referendum in 15 days but the anger against it and the concerns about the protection of women under the new constitution, the role of islam under the new constitution, that has raised the number of protesters we are seeing tonight. >>shepard: and nothing has lessened the numbers. >>reporter: it was an intent to try and stem the profit but the reverse is happening with larger and stronger crowds than last night. some of the opposition leaders say they vow to sleep in this square until the president backs down. the president has supporters and we are likely to see the muslim brotherhood to come out to support the president. >>shepard: thank you, steve harr
negotiations in had cairo with the turks and egyptians and other regional states trying to broker a cease-fire agreement. it's hamas setting up the dinner table. it's not israel authorities. whatever its defensive rationale, and i support israel's right to defend itself, it's radicalizing the posturing. you see unite around hamas this is not good for u.s. policy in the region. >> eliot: we have this mundane but nets question who is winning, and win something hard to define but joe you gave one interpretation, who is being elevated, who is gaining negotiating leverage in the long run. do you agree that hamas is gaining ground in this? >> yes, but they gain ground in the weirdest way. hamas does not succeed by causing more pain to israel. it's the opposite. it succeed by forcing israel to behave in such a way that hundreds of civilians or dozens of civilians are killed. hamas is not inflicting damage on israel as you pointed out in your statement. the iron dome defense system has largely spared israel from harm. israel succeed by harming hamas. israel fails by harming hamas because they get
with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some point. palestinian factions here say they are open to it. they say nothing has been signed. they don't mind having a short-term truce. so long as egypt will guarantee the fundamental issues of the bigger problems of gaza are addressed and not kicked down the road. i think that's something that martin suggested. there are a lot of fund mental issues that need to be resolved. no indication all of those have been addressed in the short-term cessation of hostilities which egyptian officials say is within their reach, although nothing yet officia
to cairo where she's meeting with the egyptian president mursi. mrs. clinton making it clear that she is not interested in a quick fix in gaza. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability, and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> cnn reporters flanking the middle east today to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of the crisis in gaza and in jerusalem and in israel. ben wedeman is in gaza city. frederick pleitgen is in ashkelon city. we begin with sara sidner at the scene of that bus explosion that happened just a little while ago in tel aviv. sara first of all describe for me how that looks right now. >> what has happened right now is the cleanup is under way. there are still tape up around the scene. we're very close to the defense department building, and the military headquarters, this is a bus that the number 61 bus, we know that it exploded, glass all around the bus was blown out. however the blast was not strong enough to knock out the ability for the bus to operate. and so we saw literally the b
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: police and protesters clashed in cairo's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we
. >>> egypt is poised for more demonstrations in cairo tomorrow over a new constitutional crisis. president muhammed morsi's challenge to the judiciary involving holdovers from the mubarak regime and raulong traditions. joining me is ambassador dennis ross. thank you so much. good to see you. >> you too. >> egypt. now, perhaps morsi felt empowered by his role as a peacemaker on gaza, but he ran right into long-standing traditions. >> he did. he did. i think bear in mind a couple of things. number one, he felt that the role he played made him a central figure in the region as a whole. in mubarak's last few years, the fact was mubarak was increasingly on the sidelines, not playing a major role in the middle east. here's president morsi thinking he can play on the image they are a leader in the region and he can use that as a device to make a move internally. he made that move but i think it's a clear miscalculation because he took on the independents of the judiciary. it doesn't matter that. these were leaders who were holdovers from the mubarak regime, they still represented a symbol of inde
, and she'll meet with leaders in cairo next. now, the other deal, the president and congressional leaders are working on, no progress on the fiscal cliff either. congressional leaders are taking a holiday breaks from the talks, but staff members have not been encouraged by their early huddles. let me bring in politico's deputy white house editor and joanne green, managing editor of the brie owe and msnbc contributor. good morning. >> good morning. >> we'll get to the situation in the middle east in just a minute. i want to start with the fiscal cliff and politico's front page today. "rough start for fiscal cliff talks." looked like everything was going really well after that first meeting. now that the dealing is really getting under way, the sources tell politico neither side seems actually all that serious. what's going on here? >> our reporting shows that despite the politics of the seeming to suggest that a deal should be struck and despite the meeting that happened with the congressional leaders at the white house last week that had everybody walk out of it and use the word construct
and hamas. the head of hamas is now making a statement in cairo. want to play that for you. >> translator: god took their hand off gaza and can build them to commit themselves to the conditions of the resistance. therefore, if we understand, this simplicity, we can understand as people of the media to tell the brave message of our people to the entire world, because we want the entire world to understand our people and our cause. and through you, we can explain the faces, the pale faces of the leaders of the enemy, because they have failed in their attempt and their attempts back fired against them. they wanted to destroy the infrastructure of the resistance in hamas. today, they claim they have done so, and they have not. this is -- they are bankrupt. i don't deny they have done so much, we could count how many buildings they have destroyed. and how many offices of the media they have destroyed and how many children they have kill ed. and how many journalists and how many photographers they have killed, just like you. we can count how many offices and how many buildings they have destroy
told that he did not agree to that shetion went to cairo, where the one thing she did achieve is she got the egyptian president, mohamed morsi to be the address if hamas breaks the ceasefire and begins firing rockets into israel again, that egypt will be responsible, and will be held responsibility, they have taken responsibility, but this is a verbal agreement, this is not a written agreement, there is no implementation mechanism in place, this is really just a cooling-off period. to see if negotiators can really get at the root issues that are the smuggling tunnels for weapons coming in to the gaza strip, many from iran and the sinai desert, and whether hamas will be disarmed in the end. lou: the stubborn choice for both, palestinians and the israelis, the right to govern themselves, versus the right assurance guaranteed security. how surprising is it, to you, that israel would agree to this ceasefire on the same day a bomb goes off in tel aviv? >> well, it was quite surprising to me, lou, last time there was a terror attack in tel tel avivs who, 006, was in 2006, i remember, i was
himself sweeping powers last week. correspondent steve harrigan has the latest from cairo. >> egypt president mohammed morsi is looking for a way out the fire storm he created thursday when he claimed the orders were not subject to review by egypt's court that move sparked four days of violent street in egypt. in the protest, 13 offices of the muslim brotherhood, morsi's chief supporters were ransacked or set on fire. morsi met today with senior judges from the judiciary council looking for a compromise to halt the violence. aides say morsi might be willing to limit the scope of his decree, but not withdraw it entirely. morsi supporters say the increased powers are only temporary, until a new constitution is completed. opponents say it's a power grab and part of an attempt to instill islamic law in egypt. >> we demand the president listen to people who chose it. people elected him so he would defend the people. not to do what he pleases. >> the administration was careful with the words. not overly critical. we raised concerns. that in part answers the questions. >> they reach out fo
continued at this hour in cairo in meetings reportedly taking place involving the prime minister of egypt, the prime minister of turkey as well as the emir trying to come up with a cease-fire there are indications the talks are continuing but here on the ground they plan to implement some kind of ground incursion into gaza if necessary. the military has been offered to draft as many as 57,000 reservists. you can see roads are closed off and see and hear an increased amount of military activity. if there is not a diplomatic solution soon it looks like the violence is going to be ratcheted up. >> heather: david lee miller. thank you. >> gregg: let's take a look. so far 57 rockets have landed inside israel. that doesn't include the 25 rockets that have been intercepted by israel's iron dome. since the started the pillar of defense over 400 rockets and miles have hit hundreds more have been intercepted. how exactly does the iron dome missile defense work? they calculate each rocket's trajectory and only intercepted those that will hate target. this is iron dome to a vast array of sensors to d
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